Innovation thriving in Temple’s health care ecosystem

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March 9, 2021
Dallas Business Journal | Adrian Cannady  –  President and CEO, Temple Economic Development Corporation

Temple has established itself as a leader in health care and innovation due to the abundance of top-tier health care establishments in the region and the workforce that powers these institutions. In fact, 30.2% of the city’s population is trained and working in the health care industry.

The industry in Temple and the surrounding Killeen-Temple MSA is also a significant force in the regional economy — employing 25,900 workers and generating an estimated $102.6 million in local tax revenue for cities, counties, and school districts in the region in 2019.

Temple Medical and Educational District (TMED) is the foundation for Temple’s health and life sciences ecosystem. Established in 2009 to promote future development around existing industry assets, TMED is where some of the state’s established medical institutions are giving Central Texas direct access to exceptional health care.

World-class institutions

Temple’s state-of-the-art medical facilities are at the crux of the region’s health care innovation. Among the prominent institutions that call Temple home are Baylor Scott & White Health, the largest not-for-profit health care system in the state of Texas; McLane Children’s Hospital, the only children’s hospital between Dallas and Austin; and the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the largest VA medical consortium in Texas, serving more than 250,000 veterans across 39 local counties each year.

Adding to Temple’s distinguished line of medical institutions is Everest Rehabilitation Hospitals. Headquartered in Dallas, the company opened a $23 million, 36-bed rehabilitation hospital in Temple — bringing 120 new jobs to the city in 2019.

Beyond these health care providers, the Temple Health and Bioscience District (THBD) cultivates local entrepreneurship by mentoring early-stage biotech companies and helping them reach success. The facility was created to grow such companies from concept to commercialization through funding, counseling, and providing access to labs and equipment. The district’s programs include e-learning series webinars, annual conferences, internships and more. Tenants are also introduced to an extensive network of collaborators and mentors to help further their professional endeavors.

In recent news, Houston-based Baylor College of Medicine announced plans to open a new medical school campus in Temple in 2023 as part of a collaboration with Baylor Scott & White Health. The establishment of a new campus will attract more industry professionals to Temple’s existing talent pipeline, and support the growth of companies formed out of this new research partnership.

Additionally, when exploring the successes of Temple’s health and life sciences industry, it’s important to mention the medical education cluster formed by Texas A&M University-Central Texas, University of Mary Hardin Baylor and Texas Bioscience Institute at Temple College, which offers students the opportunity to earn up to 60 college credit hours in STEM curriculum. This array of colleges of sciences and technology are educating and expanding the future of our health and life sciences workforce, with the goal of creating a strong talent pipeline of highly educated skilled workers.

Visit templeedc.com to learn more about Temple’s position as a hotbed for health and life sciences.

Temple Economic Development Corporation (Temple EDC) works to enhance economic development and quality of life for businesses and residents in Temple, Texas. For more information about doing business in Temple, visit templeedc.com.

Bioscience District approves grant for transplant hospitality house

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March 9, 2021
Temple Daily Telegram | Eric Garcia

The board of the Temple Health and Bioscience District approved an $11,250 grant to support Amy’s House, the Temple facility for transplant patients and their caregivers.

The hospitality house, 2114 S. 15th St., is sponsored by Transplant Recipients International Organization Central Texas, is located near the east side of Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Temple for ease of access for patients.

Board chairman Thomas Baird said the nonprofit life science facility approved the action Feb. 24.

“Everything we can do to support health care and help our community is a priority for Temple Health and Bioscience District,” Baird said. “We are very supportive and worked with city of Temple and Amy’s House from the beginning. They make the transplant process for families smoother. Amy’s House provides a place to stay so that patients and their families can focus on the hard parts of the transplant process. They support the success of Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Temple and the transplant department, and that is an initiative we support wholeheartedly.”

Amy’s House provides temporary housing at an affordable cost, according to a news release.

From Jan. 4 to March 2 this year, Amy’s House has provided a total of 41 nights of stay for 13 patients and caregivers, with each guest staying an average of six nights, the Bioscience District said.

“The need is great. Patients come in from all over Texas to be cared for by Baylor Scott & White Transplant Center – Temple. So far in 2021, guests of Amy’s House have driven an average of 118 miles to see providers and stay at the facility,” the release said.

The facility is a place to heal after surgery, Dr. Debra K. Doherty, surgical director for the Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program, Baylor Scott & White – Temple Region, said.

“Thanks to the generosity of those who are helping with this project, several patients have already taken advantage of Amy’s House and have commented how wonderful it is to have a home away from home – allowing them to focus on getting well,” Doherty said.

The $11,250 grant will help the further development of the facility.

The Bioscience District, which supported Amy’s House since its inception, provided funds to aid in the construction of the facility. The building cost $1.1 million to build, encompassing about 6,000 square feet. The facility includes eight bedrooms, a kitchen, a conference room and offices.

 “We could not be more grateful to the Temple Health & Bioscience District for these additional funds,” Amy’s House Executive Director Jim Fly said. “It takes a community presence like Temple’s to make a nonprofit like ours operate successfully. We look forward to continuing to serve transplant patients and their families with your support.”

Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Temple’s transplant department continues to grow and expand. The department had 840 referrals and 138 transplants in 2020, of which 127 were kidney and pancreas, and 12 were living donor transplants, the release said. The department’s goal is to perform 165 transplants in 2021. A majority of the transplant patients served by the hospital are from low socio-economic families, and more than 60 percent live more than 50 miles from Temple.

Amy’s House, which held a ribbon cutting in December, welcomed its first guest on Jan. 4.

Temple helped the facility by donating land to TRIO, Mayor Tim Davis said.

 “For the city of Temple to have the chance to be involved in taking care of those families in a time of need, it is a great honor to get to be a part of that,” Davis told the Telegram in December. “The stress of having a family member with a serious medical condition can be overwhelming, and with something like Amy’s House stepping in and being able to provide a safe, comfortable and affordable place for that family to stay while they are caring for their loved one is great.”

Temple Health and Bioscience District Approves Additional Funding for Amy’s House

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 4, 2021

Temple Health and Bioscience District Approves Additional Funding for Amy’s House
Temple’s nonprofit receives $11,250 grant to continue serving central Texas transplant surgery patients and their families

TEMPLE, TEXAS – On Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2021, the board of Temple Health and Bioscience District (THBD), the nonprofit, city-supported life science facility, approved an $11,250 grant to support Amy’s House, a hospitality house for transplant patients and their caregivers.

“Everything we can do to support healthcare and help our community is a priority for Temple Health and Bioscience District.” shares Thomas Baird, Board Chairman of THBD. “We are very supportive and worked with City of Temple and Amy’s House from the beginning. They make the transplant process for families smoother. Amy’s House provides a place to stay so that patients and their families can focus on the hard parts of the transplant process. They support the success of Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Temple and the transplant department, and that is an initiative we support wholeheartedly.”

Amy’s House, sponsored by TRIO Central Texas, Transplant Recipients International Organization, provides temporary housing for transplant patients and their families at an affordable cost. The service Amy’s House provides supports the growth of the healthcare community in central Texas, specifically Baylor Scott & White’s transplant department.

So far this year, from January 4 to March 2, Amy’s House has provided a total of 41 nights of stay for 13 total patients and caregivers, with each guest staying an average of six nights. The need is great. Patients come in from all over Texas to be cared for by Baylor Scott & White Transplant Center – Temple. So far in 2021, guests of Amy’s House have driven an average of 118 miles to see providers and stay at the facility.

“As our patients travel throughout Texas and beyond to receive organ transplants, they often spend days or weeks away from home. With Amy’s House nearby, our transplant patients at Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Temple have additional support and a place to heal immediately after surgery,” said Debra K. Doherty, MD, surgical director, Kidney and Pancreas Transplant Program, Baylor Scott & White – Temple Region. “Thanks to the generosity of those who are helping with this project, several patients have already taken advantage of Amy’s House and have commented how wonderful it is to have a home away from home – allowing them to focus on getting well.”

This $11,250 grant will help the further development of the housing facility. THBD has supported Amy’s House since its inception. THBD provided funds to aid in the construction of Amy’s house. Amy’s House resides at the corner of Avenue U and South 15th Street, near Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Temple.

“We could not be more grateful to the Temple Health & Bioscience District for these additional funds,” said Amy’s House Executive Director Jim Fly. “It takes a community presence like Temple’s to make a nonprofit like ours operate successfully. We look forward to continuing to serve transplant patients and their families with your support.”

Like other transplant centers across the country, Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Temple’s transplant department continues to grow and expand to meet the growing demand for organ transplants nationwide. The department had 840 referrals and 138 transplants in 2020, of which 127 were kidney and pancreas, and 12 were living donor transplants. The department has set a goal of 165 transplants in 2021. A majority of the transplant patients served by the team at Baylor Scott & White – Temple are from low socio-economic families, and more than 60 percent live more than 50 miles from the hospital.

The mission of Amy’s House is to provide in their eight-bedroom hospitality house affordable temporary housing for as many of these Baylor Scott & White organ transplant patients and their caregivers as possible. Amy’s House welcomed its first guest on January 4, 2021 and has the capacity for eight patients and their families at one time.

According to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), more than 109,000 individuals were listed on the national transplant waiting list in September 2020. Nearly 40,000 transplants were conducted in the United States in 2019, but 17 people die in the country daily waiting for an organ transplant every day.

To learn more about Amy’s House, sponsored by Transplant Recipients International Organization (TRIO) Central Texas, visit triocentraltexas.org/amyshouse. Visit templebioscience.org to learn more about THBD and its impact on the community.

ABOUT BAYLOR SCOTT & WHITE HEALTH

As the largest not-for-profit health system in the state of Texas, Baylor Scott & White Health promotes the health and well-being of every individual, family and community it serves. An integrated care delivery network, the system includes the Scott and White Health Plan, Baylor Scott & White Research Institute and Baylor Scott & White Quality Alliance. Through 51 hospitals and more than 1,100 access points including flagship academic medical centers in Dallas and Temple, the system offers the full continuum of care, from primary to award-winning specialty care, throughout Texas, and via virtual touchpoints. If its service area were a state, it would be the eighth largest, providing care to a population larger than that of the state of Georgia. Founded as a Christian ministry of healing, Baylor Scott & White is proud to honor its century-long legacy through its commitment to improving accessibility, affordability and the customer experience for all. For more information, visit BSWHealth.com.

ABOUT TEMPLE HEALTH & BIOSCIENCE DISTRICT
Temple Health and Bioscience District (THBD) grows twenty-first century jobs by fostering life science education, innovation, and healthcare in central Texas. A taxpayer-funded nonprofit and only one of its kind in Texas, THBD was created by legislation to support the economic development of central Texas’ growing health corridor. To learn more, visit TempleBioScience.org. Join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @TempleHBD.

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Amy’s House in Temple receiving first guest

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FOX 44 News | Dean Wetherbee

A house built specifically to help adult transplant patients is receiving its first guest Monday night.

Construction of Amy’s House started in early 2020 in Temple, sponsored by the Central Texas chapter of TRIO, which stands for Transplant Recipients International Organization.

TRIO raised the funding for Amy’s House in part with help from the Temple Health and Bioscience District.

The house is near Baylor Scott and White Medical Center. There are eight bedrooms, each with two beds and a private bathroom.

Executive Director Jim Fly says the house will normally be able to help up to eight transplant patients and their families in a communal setting, but because of COVID-19 they are limited to one or two families right now.

Amy’s House is named after Amy Henderson Firth, who died in November of 2012. She was an organ donor and lives on through more than 70 other people.