Temple Health and Bioscience District 2020 Scholars Program Internship Applications Now Open

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                           
January 16, 2020

Temple Health and Bioscience District 2020 Scholars Program Internship Applications Now Open
Seeking STEM-Driven College Students and Mentors

TEMPLE, TEXAS Temple Health and Bioscience District (THBD), Temple, Texas’ own not-for-profit, city-supported bioscience incubator, invites ambitious college students with a passion for STEM (science, engineering, technology, and math) field studies to apply for the 2020 THBD Scholars Program in Temple, Texas taking place June 1 to July 31, 2020. Applications must be submitted by February 15, 2020. Internships range from 20 to 40 hours per week with paid scholarships available to qualified participants. Here is the link to apply: templebioscience.org/internship/#THBDScholars.

The THBD Scholars Program attracts qualified college students from across the state to be paired by program leaders with local businesses and researchers for mentorship and training. Internship opportunities will include hands-on experience in medical fields including cancer and infectious disease research, 3D printing, entrepreneurship, public health, medical device technology and more.

“The most powerful way to make a positive impact on our community and the future of the growing biotech corridor across central Texas is to educate the bright students of our future,” said Tami Annable, Executive Director of Temple Health & Bioscience District. “We are fortunate to have ample resources in science, health, engineering, and technology industries right here in Temple, Texas. Program mentors in top leadership positions eagerly await a bright list of candidates for this year’s THBD Scholars Program. We encourage students to apply now and look forward to all of the exciting opportunities this year brings.”

 

THBD is proud to offer research and experiential opportunities in the following areas:

  • 3D Printing
  • Business / Entrepreneurship
  • Cardiology
  • Hospital Logistics
  • Infectious Disease
  • Medical Device Technology
  • Neurology
  • Oncology
  • Psychology
  • Public Health Services

Local mentors and top health, science and technology organizations join THBD to provide real-world experience for the THBD Scholars Program. 2019 mentors included Bonnie Morehead, M.D. from the Texas Department of State Health Services; Scot Andrews, Impac Systems; Ryan Quinn, SiMMo3D; David Dostal, Ph.D., Matt McMillin, Ph.D., and Sharon DeMorrow, Ph.D., Dell Medical School and the Central Texas Veterans Health Care System (VA); Chetan Jinadatha, M.D., Central Texas VA.

The 2019 Scholars Program sponsored eight college students from universities across Texas, including the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, the University of Texas at San Antonio, the University of Texas at Dallas, and Texas A&M University.

HOW TO APPLY:

Students must be available to participate for the full duration of the internship program from June 1 to July 31, 2020. Online applications must be filled by February 15, 2020 for the summer 2020 internship program. Students will be notified of acceptance on March 15, 2020.

INTERNSHIP BENEFITS:

Students will receive a $2,000 paid stipend with housing available (cost deducted from stipend), hands-on experience with local STEM professionals, and a public poster session and dinner to showcase their work at the close of the program. (See 2019 poster session photos here.)

The THBD Scholars Program was formed by the Central Texas Scientific Advocacy Group, an organization co-founded in September 2018 by Tami Annable, THBD Executive Director; David Sprague, M.D.; Colin Dodson and Ryan Quinn, THBD tenants and co-founders of SiMMo3D; and with the support of the THBD Board of Directors.

Located in the growing biotech corridor of Temple, Texas, THBD currently houses six tenants with additional occupancy available. THBD is funded by citizens of Temple and is the first such district to be created in Texas, with the primary goal of supporting local economic development. Its 5,000-sq. ft. laboratory and office facility provide equipment for prototyping, testing, 3D printing and cell research. In addition to office and laboratory space, THBD provides networking opportunities with local area collaborators: Baylor Scott and White hospital system, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Texas A&M’s AgriLife Research Center, Texas A&M Health Science Center (medical school), and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).

THBD, the only not-for-profit incubator of its kind in Texas, offers startups in the biotech and life science industries a comprehensive lab and office facility with state-of the-art equipment, startup resources and mentoring. The district offers the internship program as part of its mission to grow 21st century jobs by fostering bioscience education, research and healthcare in central Texas.

High-resolution images available: 2019 Scholars Program

ABOUT TEMPLE HEALTH & BIOSCIENCE DISTRICT
The Temple Health and Bioscience District (THBD) was created as a result of legislation passed by the State of Texas in 2003 and approved by Temple voters to establish the facility in 2009. The THBD Office and Laboratory Facility provides premier office and lab space for early-stage biotech companies that are taking health-related products from conception to manufacturing. Temple’s Health and Bioscience District is governed by a seven-member board. The board members are elected by the citizens of Temple and serve staggered three-year terms. The operational activities of the District are led by an Executive Director who is appointed by the board. To learn more, visit: TempleBioScience.org. Join the conversation on Twitter @TempleHBD, Instagram @TempleHBD and on Facebook.com/TempleHBD.

 

Media Contact:
Lauren Lovell
(713) 828-6123
Lauren@LiveOutLoudPR.com

A Bright Future for Bioscience in Temple, Texas

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January 3, 2020
Austin Startups | By Lauren Lovell, Temple Health & Bioscience District

As part of Temple Health and Bioscience District’s (THBD) mission to grow twenty-first century jobs by fostering bioscience education, research and healthcare in Central Texas, the team at THBD hosted high school students from Temple Independent School District (TISD) for a tour of the office and laboratory facility this month.

“Temple ISD is a forward-thinking district and we’re proud to work with them. The bright minds touring our facility are the bioscience innovators of tomorrow. We want to inspire children by showing them that biotech careers are thriving right here in their own home town. These are achievable dreams, and our goal as a bioscience incubator is to help make those dreams reality through education, mentorship, and access to technology.” — Tami Annable, THBD Executive Director.

During the tour, students experienced real-life bioscience activities in the lab from THBD staff and THBD tenant companies including SiMMo3D, a 3D-printed medical device replica company. In addition to learning to pipette, students used the incubator’s microscope to examine cancer cells and witness applications of 3D printing in healthcare.

The 5,000 square foot office and laboratory facility opened up its common lab to students. In the common lab is a wealth of specialized equipment including a J750 3D printer and an Instron machine for product testing and prototyping. The students were able to gain hands-on experience in the lab with goggles and lab coats on as they created their own 3D-printed items to take home.

THBD partners with Temple Independent School District (TISD) to encourage future generations of students to pursue careers in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) fields. By sharing local resources with students, THBD propels the growth of Central Texas’ thriving biotech corridor.

About Temple Health and Bioscience District (THBD)

The Temple Health and Bioscience District (THBD) was created as a result of legislation passed by the State of Texas in 2003 and approved by Temple voters to establish the facility in 2009. The THBD Office and Laboratory Facility provides premier office and lab space for early-stage biotech companies that are taking health-related products from conception to manufacturing. Temple’s Health and Bioscience District is governed by a seven-member board. The board members are elected by the citizens of Temple and serve staggered three-year terms. The operational activities of the District are led by an Executive Director who is appointed by the board.

To learn more, visit: TempleBioScience.org.

Connect with Temple Health and Bioscience District

Twitter @TempleHBD

Instagram @TempleHBD

Facebook.com/TempleHBD.

Bioscience tour: Temple High students learn about research work at local facility

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December 27, 2019
Temple Daily Telegram | By Janice Gibbs

In November, Temple High International Baccalaureate students spent a couple of hours at the Temple Health and Bioscience District office and lab facility learning what type of research work goes on in the building and who works there.

In December, Temple High students in advance placement classes visited the facility and received some hands on instruction using some of the District’s high tech medical research equipment.

Shaterika Griffin, 11th grader at Temple High, had been on the tour in November as an IB student, but felt the tour for the Advance Placement students was better.

Gabriela Leon said she learned from the focus on engineering of some of the tenants.

Griffin said she knew there was technology to slice cells, but hadn’t seen it first-hand until her visit to the district facility’s common lab.

The Instron Linear-Torsion Material Testing System caught the attention of Leon, also an 11th grader.

Griffin is interested in becoming an audiologist and was interested how the 3D printer could be used to make hearing aids and parts for hearing aids.

Leon is considering mechanical engineering for a career and found the Instron System fascinating.

Tami Annable, executive director of Temple Health and Bioscience District, explained to the students that the district’s board of directors fund a number of summer internships that place high school students with compatible mentors in medical and science research facilities in the area.

During the tour, students were broken into small groups and spent time with investigators who work in the Bioscience District facility.

Colin Dodson, biomedical engineer and chief technical officer and a founder of SiMMo3D, explained how his company uses the Instron Testing System. Dodson demonstrated testing a part of a hip replacement that had been reinforced. The question was if the changes would make the replacements stronger and less prone breakage.

Using the Instron Dodson could simulate the stress on the hip replacement part with repetitive walking, running and jumping.

A readout on a screen that is part of the testing system provides information on the forces being placed on the item being tested.

During the test the forces and pace are increased, Dodson said.

“What I’ll typically do is have these experiments run for a very long time at a fast rate,” he said.

The physician, who initially comes up with the idea and a template for the device, will at times want to see how far the item can be pushed until the part breaks, Dodson said.

These devices are made to function inside the human being for the remainder of their lives, he said.

Once a final material is selected for the device, material testing will continue, before it’s placed inside a person, Dodson said.

Ryan Quinn, co-founder of SiMMo3D, began working with 3D printing while a student at the University of Texas at San Antonio, where he studied entrepreneurship.

He walked the Temple Hig1h students through how his company uses 3-D printing process.

SiMMo3D provides accurate replicas of healthy or diseased organs for education.

Using MRI data, CT scans, synthetic polymer resin and a 3-D printer, Quinn and Dodson make organ models used for medical training and for planning specific procedures.

Operations manager Rod Annable, Tami’s husband, explained to the students there are a variety of resins that can be used in 3-D printing.

It’s important that the correct resin is selected for the project, Annable said as he held up a 3-D printed wrench that flopped over as if it were made of Jell-O.

Tami Annable walked the students through slicing samples of mouse brain cells using a laser with the Leica Microdissection System.

David Sprague, a former fertility investigator with Scott & White, explained the equipment typically found in a lab and demonstrated how it is used.

Texas Bioscience Institute students are supposed to tour of the district facility in January.

For information on THBD, visit www.templebioscience.org.

Temple High students tour bioscience facility

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December 21, 2019
Killeen Daily Herald | By Janice Gibbs

Student tours of the Temple Health and Bioscience District office and lab facility continued this month.

So far, students in the Temple High School advance placement and International Baccalaureate programs have visited the facility, said Tami Annable, executive director of Temple Health and Bioscience District.

Annable provided an update at the board’s December meeting.

Next month, students from the Texas Bioscience District will be given a tour.

Members of the current Temple Chamber of Commerce Leadership Temple Class visited the Bioscience District facility in November during its focus on health and social services.

Rod Annable, operations manager for the Bioscience District, talked about improving the fence of the enclosure that houses the building’s air compressors.

“People had climbed over the fence to steal items,” Annable said.

The fence now reaches to the top of the enclosure and no one can climb in, he said.

“You don’t want to have the compressors damaged,” Annable said.

The Leica Microscope is running on Windows 7 and Leica recommends updating the software to Windows 10, however the current computer can’t handle the upgrade.

Leica provided a quote of $5,745 for workstation, labor and travel, said Tami Annable.

She contacted Lighthouse IT, who provides technology services to the district, to get its opinion. Lighthouse advised waiting until there is a problem, she said.

“I just want this on your radar,” Annable told the board. “The Leica is working fine, but eventually it will need an upgrade.”

Leica Microdissection Microscope, also known as Laser Capture Microdissection, is a contact- and contamination-free method for isolating specific single cells or entire areas of tissue from a wide variety of tissue samples.

Doug Streater, secretary-treasurer of the Bioscience District board, resigned his position at the November board meeting. Board member Brian Reinhardt was appointed the new secretary-treasurer.